BERGGER Pancro 400 with CineStill Df96

A picture is worth a thousand words… so this is going to be a very short review!

Thoughts:

Bergger Pancro 400 reminds me a lot of XX by Kodak– it has a very classic long greyscale with just the right amount of grain and amazing highlight control. The quality control is very high, and I love that it’s available in all formats, 35mm through 8×10 sheet film. After extensive testing I have decided to make it my go-to 120 film… yeah it’s that good! In 4×5 the grain is very, very smooth and round. In 120 the grain is there, but very fine and beautiful which I think adds a wonderful depth to the scanned film. As for 35mm? There will be grain, but again it is a classic looking grain, which I love.

So, if you want lifeless, flat, smooth boring film? Bergger Pancro 400 is not for you! This film is classic… and combined with Df96 developer it hits all the right marks.

Tips:

  1. Rate Bergger Pancro 400 at between 100-325…. I find 200/250 to be the sweet spot if you want full shadow detail. This holds true for all the developers I tested this film with.
  2. CineStill Df96 MonoBath developer produces the very BEST negatives I have seen with this film; it is a perfect combination.
  3. Try pulling the film with Df96… shoot it at 200 and pull 1/2 to 1 stop in development. Note: I did not do that in the sample image above but I could have… it’s a nice way to control high contrast scenes.

Viva la Revolution- Steve

PS- in case you missed it here is a link to the review I did on the CineStill Df96 developer.
https://emulsive.org/darkroom/review-cinestill-df96-monobath-developer-by-stephen-schaub

Pinhole Film Tests With ORTHOTOPOSCOPE SS Camera

Running a test with my new ORTHOTOPOSCOPE SS camera (6×12) and a non optimized pinhole of around F70 (optimized is around F130 for the 25mm focal length). I am looking at the following films with EI from approx 100-1600 all in developers I have found that works best for maximum compensation and best overall tonality with each specific film. Reciprocity corrections were kept to just a gerous doubling to time— with this type of camera and work I like to keep it simple if possible. Exposures ranged from 1 second to 30 seconds all handheld as that is my standard way of shooting with a pinhole system.

  • 400TX • Diafine
  • 400Tmax • 510 Pyro
  • Delta 3200 • 510 Pyro
  • Fuji 400CN • C41
  • Portra 400 • C41
  • CineStill 800T • C41

All test results will be converted to B&W as that is my current need with these materials.

UPDATE: So I’ve looked at the film and I am very drawn to the Porta 400 and VERY drawn to the Cinestill 800T when both are converted to B&W. The regular B&W film was amazing but due to the pinhole capture I had a lot more range of possibilities in the conversion process that really helped to bring out crazy tonal separation in the two color negative materials.