CineStill BwXX is Now in 120!!

Please click on the audio play button above for a 6 minute review of this amazing film now in 120 for the first time ever. Sample images below!

Features:

• Black and white negative film

• Variable speed (ISO 200-800) I’ve pushed to 1600 with very good results, but the sweet spot is around 400.

• 120 format!!!!!!!!!!!!

• Classic cinematic look

• Rich tonality

• Excellent sharpness 

One of a kind camera meets one of a kind film!

EveNSteve like this film so much we’ve already made an artwork using it. Click on the movie below to watch the one minute artwork film by EveNSteve:

There Are Forests In The Animals

Sample images!!!

As I mentioned in the audio above I really wanted to showcase the cinematic feeling this film has, but also show the creative flexibility that is possible. This is not a modern film, and that is a very good thing!

A few sample images below showing the packaging which is of very high quality and a little bit of camera porn….

In conclusion I think the images speak for themselves. How wonderful in 2021 to be welcoming a “new” B&W film to our world… 

Viva la Revolution-

Steve

PS— Processing Times in a variety of developers….

https://cinestillfilm.com/pages/bwxx-dev-times

CineStill CS6 “CREATIVE SLIDE”

I was very happy to be asked a few months ago to look at this new E6 process from CineStill and give them my thoughts. After testing for Kodak the new E100 in 120 last year this was indeed an exciting development. (See what I did there? Somewhere right now my wife is rolling her eyes.)

Figure In Window

E100 DaylightChrome Developer • Linhof 6×12 with 58mm XL • 120

 

So what’s unique about this E6 kit? Here are the descriptions from their website:

D9 “DynamicChrome” Warm-Tone Dynamic 1st Developer.
Renders approximately 9+ stops of usable dynamic-range*!  Conventional E-6 processing renders approximately 6 stops of usable dynamic-range*. Extended exposure latitude while maintaining vibrant color-contrast and rich warm-tones with preserved highlight and shadow detail (optimized for scanning) for a more cinematic look. High-dynamic-range for warm-tone slides in daylight, shade or with electronic flash.

FarmBuildings_E100_Dynamic
E100 DynamicChrome Developer • Widelux F7 • 35mm ©Schaub 2020

 

D6 “DaylightChrome” Neutral-Tone 5500K 1st Developer.
Renders approximately 6+ stops of usable dynamic-range*, with brighter whites and moderately enhanced color saturation, just like conventional E-6 processing. Daylight-balanced 5500K for neutral-tone slides in daylight or with electronic flash.

Windows_E100_D
E100 DaylightChrome Developer • Fotoman 6×24 with 90mm XL • 120 ©Schaub 2020

Barn_E100_D
E100 DaylightChrome Developer • Fotoman 6×24 with 90mm XL • 120 ©Schaub 2020

Barns_E100_D
E100 DaylightChrome Developer • Fotoman 6×24 with 90mm XL • 120 ©Schaub 2020

T6 “TungstenChrome” Cool-Tone 3200K 1st Developer.
Renders approximately 6+ stops of usable dynamic-range* with brighter whites, and moderately enhanced color saturation. Tungsten-balanced 3200K for artificial light or cool-tone E100T slides. Also, works great for push processing in limited light!

Orchard_E100_P800_T
E100 PUSHED to 800 TungstenChrome • Linhof 6×17 with 90mm SA • 120  ©Schaub 2020             In this example I wanted to see how using the film in daylight and pushing could create interesting cinematic contrast and color… I was very happy with the results.

I found mixing the chemicals to be easy and processing in my JOBO was a piece of cake. I already run my own C41 in house as well as a myriad of B&W developers.

My biggest advice to anyone who wants to process their own E6: the developer temperature is critical. Keep the developer within 1 degree F or less for best color, contrast and density.

For more information please visit:

Cs6 “Creative Slide” 3-Bath Process for color-timing E-6 reversal film

In conclusion…. I think CineStill’s new offering is a unique and valued addition to the E-6 processing community. It doesn’t seem so long ago that Ektachrome was discontinued- temporarily as it turned out. But today that tide has turned, and I continue to be excited by the strong and vibrant resurgence of film and film processing options.

Viva la Revolution!-

Steve