CineStill CS6 “CREATIVE SLIDE”

I was very happy to be asked a few months ago to look at this new E6 process from CineStill and give them my thoughts. After testing for Kodak the new E100 in 120 last year this was indeed an exciting development. (See what I did there? Somewhere right now my wife is rolling her eyes.)

Figure In Window

E100 DaylightChrome Developer • Linhof 6×12 with 58mm XL • 120

 

So what’s unique about this E6 kit? Here are the descriptions from their website:

D9 “DynamicChrome” Warm-Tone Dynamic 1st Developer.
Renders approximately 9+ stops of usable dynamic-range*!  Conventional E-6 processing renders approximately 6 stops of usable dynamic-range*. Extended exposure latitude while maintaining vibrant color-contrast and rich warm-tones with preserved highlight and shadow detail (optimized for scanning) for a more cinematic look. High-dynamic-range for warm-tone slides in daylight, shade or with electronic flash.

FarmBuildings_E100_Dynamic
E100 DynamicChrome Developer • Widelux F7 • 35mm ©Schaub 2020

 

D6 “DaylightChrome” Neutral-Tone 5500K 1st Developer.
Renders approximately 6+ stops of usable dynamic-range*, with brighter whites and moderately enhanced color saturation, just like conventional E-6 processing. Daylight-balanced 5500K for neutral-tone slides in daylight or with electronic flash.

Windows_E100_D
E100 DaylightChrome Developer • Fotoman 6×24 with 90mm XL • 120 ©Schaub 2020
Barn_E100_D
E100 DaylightChrome Developer • Fotoman 6×24 with 90mm XL • 120 ©Schaub 2020
Barns_E100_D
E100 DaylightChrome Developer • Fotoman 6×24 with 90mm XL • 120 ©Schaub 2020

T6 “TungstenChrome” Cool-Tone 3200K 1st Developer.
Renders approximately 6+ stops of usable dynamic-range* with brighter whites, and moderately enhanced color saturation. Tungsten-balanced 3200K for artificial light or cool-tone E100T slides. Also, works great for push processing in limited light!

Orchard_E100_P800_T
E100 PUSHED to 800 TungstenChrome • Linhof 6×17 with 90mm SA • 120  ©Schaub 2020             In this example I wanted to see how using the film in daylight and pushing could create interesting cinematic contrast and color… I was very happy with the results.

I found mixing the chemicals to be easy and processing in my JOBO was a piece of cake. I already run my own C41 in house as well as a myriad of B&W developers.

My biggest advice to anyone who wants to process their own E6: the developer temperature is critical. Keep the developer within 1 degree F or less for best color, contrast and density.

For more information please visit:

Cs6 “Creative Slide” 3-Bath Process for color-timing E-6 reversal film

In conclusion…. I think CineStill’s new offering is a unique and valued addition to the E-6 processing community. It doesn’t seem so long ago that Ektachrome was discontinued- temporarily as it turned out. But today that tide has turned, and I continue to be excited by the strong and vibrant resurgence of film and film processing options.

Viva la Revolution!-

Steve

 

CineStill Df96 Mono Bath Developer Now in Powder

This makes me very happy! Back when I did my review of Df96 monobath developer (link below) my only issue was the cost of shipping liquid chems is very high due to the weight. I asked about the possibility of a power version and was received with a hmmmmmm…. well that hmmmmm has turned into a big YES. This is very good news not only from an economic standpoint but it will now allow this chemical to ship to many more locations and the increased shelf life of unmixed powder is a very big plus.

Nice way to start a Friday.

 

My Review of Df96

https://emulsive.org/articles/darkroom/review-cinestill-df96-monobath-developer-by-stephen-schaub

Also good to note that CineStill just released their C41 chemistry in powder as well.

Viva la Revolution-

Steve

 

CineStill BwXX Film (Kodak 5222) Developed in Instant Coffee

So here are my latest results experimenting with CineStill film in Caffenol (instant coffee)… I am very happy with this combination! I have found the usable EI for this film-developer combination to range from 100-3200, all with one processing time, but the very best is around EI 640. This test image was made with my 1956 Leica M3 with a 1960 Leica 135mm Leitz Wetzlar Elmar at F5.6.

I’ve been continuously tweaking my Caffenol developer and developing technique over the past few years… I find it to be a very solid go-to developer for virtually any black and white film.

Viva la Revolution- Steve

Please follow me on instagram for daily updates: @stephenschaub

Stephen Schaub Becomes a Movie Star

That’s right! I am happy to announce that I am being featured in an upcoming documentary of photographers who work with motion picture film for still photography. The amazing Brendan Leahy of Studio Skylight has visited my studio for location filming at the Wilson Castle in Vermont, MassMoca and The Artist Book Foundation (more on that in just a bit) and on Cape Cod. We are planning additional shooting in Mexico and NYC in the very near future. The full length documentary- featuring ten artists from across the United States, but most importantly ME- will be out in early summer and will be featured at an exhibition I am curating on the topic of motion picture film photographers at the Wilson Museum at the Southern Vermont Art Center in Manchester, Vermont.

For now please enjoy these two teaser clips… sound on for best experience…

And follow me on instagram @stephenschaub where I am posting a lot of new content and daily studio updates.

Viva la Revolution- Stephen

 

BERGGER Pancro 400 with CineStill Df96

A picture is worth a thousand words… so this is going to be a very short review!

Thoughts:

Bergger Pancro 400 reminds me a lot of XX by Kodak– it has a very classic long greyscale with just the right amount of grain and amazing highlight control. The quality control is very high, and I love that it’s available in all formats, 35mm through 8×10 sheet film. After extensive testing I have decided to make it my go-to 120 film… yeah it’s that good! In 4×5 the grain is very, very smooth and round. In 120 the grain is there, but very fine and beautiful which I think adds a wonderful depth to the scanned film. As for 35mm? There will be grain, but again it is a classic looking grain, which I love.

So, if you want lifeless, flat, smooth boring film? Bergger Pancro 400 is not for you! This film is classic… and combined with Df96 developer it hits all the right marks.

Tips:

  1. Rate Bergger Pancro 400 at between 100-325…. I find 200/250 to be the sweet spot if you want full shadow detail. This holds true for all the developers I tested this film with.
  2. CineStill Df96 MonoBath developer produces the very BEST negatives I have seen with this film; it is a perfect combination.
  3. Try pulling the film with Df96… shoot it at 200 and pull 1/2 to 1 stop in development. Note: I did not do that in the sample image above but I could have… it’s a nice way to control high contrast scenes.

Viva la Revolution- Steve

PS- in case you missed it here is a link to the review I did on the CineStill Df96 developer.
https://emulsive.org/darkroom/review-cinestill-df96-monobath-developer-by-stephen-schaub

Saving Fuji FP-100C and Wet Plate Pack Film Shooting

A lot has changed in the last few years regarding the survival of film, photographers are now making direct appeals to manufacturers and gaining support from other shooters in a global effort to save our materials. Perfect examples of this success: Impossible Project instant materials, CineStill and their new successful Indiegogo campaign, New 55 instant material, Film Ferrania and now perhaps Fuji FP-100C, only time will tell.

Screen shot 2016-03-04 at 9.53.50 AM

http://savepackfilm.net/

And then there is cool stuff like this video on how to shoot wet plate with your pack film camera!

Viva la Revolution- Steve