Kodak Ektachrome E100 is BACK in 120 and 4×5 – Full Review

 

 

 

Today is a very exciting day! Kodak has just released Ektachrome E100 in both 120 and 4×5… how’s that for a holiday present?!

Sample images below: please note they are somewhat bigger files so they make take a moment to load.

Reimagining Transparency Film

By Stephen Schaub

When I was asked to shoot a few test rolls of the new Ektachrome 100 in 120 it just happened to be October, and I just happen to live in Vermont. Of course, New England is famous for these few short weeks each year when the light, crispness and color­ engages and captivates, turning all who experience it into artists who want to capture it. The timing could not have been better.

Although my current artworks are large, complex, in-camera collages on film, often employing cross-processing and alternative developers, I realized that work would not have been a suitable test for the few precious rolls of film Kodak sent to me. Rather, I revisited my earlier, more traditional methods of working and enjoyed returning to an earlier version of myself.

I chose to shoot familiar places. I really wanted to see how the color, dynamic range and sharpness of this reborn film in 120 would behave compared to my normal negative materials. I am pleased to report that everything I loved about the old Ektachome 100 is back in a big way: the color, the pop, and the sharpness are all there. The exposure latitude is extremely good, and scanning the film was easy.

SchaubIGFinalKodakE100Group_A

Working with the combination of my Linhof Technorama 612 PCII and lenses by Schneider Kreuznach provided a profound depth and clarity, and really brought out the technical best in this film. Coupled with scans from my Imacon Scanner the resulting files really know no limits of scale of reproduction.

As a vocal advocate of traditional film, I think and talk a lot about how our relationship to film has changed; this test got me thinking in particular how much our relationship has changed with regards to transparency film. Years ago I would have been juggling a color meter and every Wratten Gelatin filter imaginable in order to color-balance the film to the light source(s) for perfect accuracy. My concern for shadow depth and detail would have resulted in most cases in a pre-exposure to balance contrast. But in 2019, with 99% of film users working in a Hybrid Workflow of film capture and digital scan, all of that is changed. Transparencies that once would have been considered too light or too dark can in most cases be saved through well thought-out scanning techniques. Choices of appropriate color spaces during the scanning process are as important to the final image as masking and color corrections were to making a great print in days gone by.

SchaubIGFinalKodakE100Group_B

Transparency materials are unique: they have a pop, a micro-clarity and a feeling that is lost to color negative materials. The ability to edit work directly on the light table is significant. Moving forward, our relationship with transparency film is built on previous strengths but now with more advantages than ever. Kodak’s Ektachrome 100 is showing us that way.

Follow all fifteen photographers who are part of the launch on Instagram:

Stephen Schaub

Wendy Laurel 

Sandra Coan

Jesse Pafundi

Michael Strickland

Mariana Montrazi

Gabriela Olmeda

Victor Laborde

Timo Kerber

Ian Howorth

Eddie Otchere

F & R

Yao Keng

Haosen Jin

Mr. Koichi Akagi

Official Press Release from Kodak Alaris:

Kodak Alaris Announces EKTACHROME E100 Availability in 120 and Sheet formats

ROCHESTER, N.Y. Dec 10, 2019 – Kodak Alaris today announced the launch of EKTACHROME E100 in larger formats. A new 120 format 5-roll propack and a new 10 sheet 4×5 box will be available to order within the next 10 days, worldwide.

These new format offerings follow on the highly successful launch of EKTACHROME E100 in 135-36x size last year. “Our new E100 film is a big hit with photographers of all ages” said Dennis Olbrich, President – Kodak Alaris Imaging Paper, Photo Chemicals and Film. “The market response has been tremendous. Adding 120 and sheet films takes us to the next level.”

Sales of professional photographic films have been steadily rising over the last few years, with professionals and enthusiasts alike rediscovering the artistic control offered by manual processes and the creative satisfaction of a physical product.

KODAK PROFESSIONAL EKTACHROME Film E100 is a daylight balanced color positive film, featuring clean, vibrant colors, a neutral tone scale, and extremely fine grain.   Its distinctive look is well suited to a wide range of applications, such as product, landscape, nature and fashion photography.

We’ve posted images from some of the photographers who participated in our pre-launch activities. Check out their work on our social media channels.

 To learn more, please visit http://www.kodakalaris.com/go/profilms

Follow us on Twitter @kodakprofilmbiz and Instagram @KodakProfessional

Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/kodakprofessional

 

Viva la Revolution- Steve!

 

 

 

 

Stephen Schaub Talk at The Artist Book Foundation at MASSMoCA

My talk at The Artist Book foundation at MASSMoCA, January 26, 2019.

Viva la Revolution- Steve

CineStill BwXX Film (Kodak 5222) Developed in Instant Coffee

So here are my latest results experimenting with CineStill film in Caffenol (instant coffee)… I am very happy with this combination! I have found the usable EI for this film-developer combination to range from 100-3200, all with one processing time, but the very best is around EI 640. This test image was made with my 1956 Leica M3 with a 1960 Leica 135mm Leitz Wetzlar Elmar at F5.6.

I’ve been continuously tweaking my Caffenol developer and developing technique over the past few years… I find it to be a very solid go-to developer for virtually any black and white film.

Viva la Revolution- Steve

Please follow me on instagram for daily updates: @stephenschaub

Now Free! Figital Revolution Manifesto PDF Download

In celebration the revolution’s ten year anniversary, I have decided to post the Figital Revolution Manifesto book as a free PDF download. (The print copy is no longer available for purchase online.) Written in 2007 and admittedly snarky and over the top, I am struck by the fact that, despite so many changes in the industry, the book is entirely still relevant today! I want to thank my wife, Eve Ogden Schaub as my co-author… she has moved onto bigger projects like her book Year of No Sugar which went viral… and her next book is due out in January 2017 so stay tuned.

Book Link:

TheFigitalRevolution

Viva la Revolution-

Stephen

 

A Leica Worth Showcasing

I am sure many of you are as disappointed in the new Leica introduced today as I am…. the Leica X Vario. This coupled with the M 240 which I am NOT a fan of makes me think Leica needs a swift kick to get back into the game. A note to Leica… do not try to compete with Fuji or Canon or Sony as you can not… Instead, do what you do best and make cameras like the M9P and my MP a la carte. Anything else is just a waste of time.

Now to put a smile on your face (well, it did mine!)… here is my newest camera with some fun additions…. a black paint Leica MP a la carte with my PinZonie 28mm pinhole lens as well as a 18mm pinhole lens in the Leica Lens Holder M on the bottom and the very cool Leica Universal Viewfinder – The Frankenfinder!! (covers 16mm-28mm with a brilliant clear view and also has parallax correction for close up distances which is sooo nice… for me the perfect walk around camera!

Schaub Leica June 2013

Viva la Revolution- Stephen

More Diafine Thoughts

Diafine Developer BoxSo currently in my JOBO CPP2 I am running Diafine full strength Part A and full strength Part B for 5 minutes for all BW films at rotation setting “F” which is around 40 rpm. After part B I increase the rotation to “P” which is around 80 rpm and keep it at that for the remainder of the process. My tests have shown that times around 7+ minutes in A/B can stain some films- yet  5 minutes in A/B at 75F seems about spot on to me and perfect for most scanning applications. The 1:1 development of Diafine decreases the shadow detail at higher EI… for example at 1:1 TX dies after about EI 800 whereas with the full strength process as outlined above EI 1600+ is very solid (note: box speed at 1:1 is about perfect- for box speed). With regards to streaking…. none, full strength or 1:1. An obvious advantage to full strength is that Diafine can be used over and over again for a lot of film where as the 1:1 is a one shot developer. I have personally used Diafine (1 gal A/B) full strength for well over a year without issue…. if it becomes a bit dirty just run it through a new clean coffee filter and presto! Perfect developer ready for more film.

Viva la Revolution- Stephen

Film Testing Kodak 400TX and Diafine Developer

Amazing couple of days running dozens of different developer tests all with 400TX… love the look of the grain and depth of this film! In the end I came back to an old friend but with a new twist. Diafine is back in my life in a big way! Diluted 1:1 and used as a one shot developer it is spot on in my JOBO with very nice grain, great tonality, no processing issues and best of all a usable EI from about 100-1250 (the chart shows 200-1600… I think 1600 is a bit on the edge for my works but is totally usable in a pinch. So again, in a JOBO speed is 4, temp does not really matter but I ran at 75F, Dilute part A and B 1:1… I did 3.5 minutes in each followed by a 2 min wash with water then fix (box time), clear (box time) and hang to dry…. easy as pie!

BarnTest200-1600

Of course an advantage of Diafine that I have written about here before is that many different films can be souped at the same time which is a huge time saver. Diafine negs are a bit flat and do requiere an “S” curve in PS to make me happy but I am now quite happy indeed. I will post links to Diafine articles I have written and a great one from a friend Sandy King from View Camera.

RiverTEST_800_Web

My suggest EI…. 800.

Viva la Revolution– Stephen

All images shot with a Leica MP with a 35MM Summicron ASPH… on Film!

LINKS:

Sandy King Article Diafine…. a must read!

as for articles here… there are a lot!!!! Just type in Diafine in the search box and enjoy!

Also please note these were just quick scans (first set) as I am leaving tomorrow for a week of shooting but the final scan (last image) is quite nice and shows the real potential for this amazing combo.