CineStill CS6 “CREATIVE SLIDE”

I was very happy to be asked a few months ago to look at this new E6 process from CineStill and give them my thoughts. After testing for Kodak the new E100 in 120 last year this was indeed an exciting development. (See what I did there? Somewhere right now my wife is rolling her eyes.)

Figure In Window

E100 DaylightChrome Developer • Linhof 6×12 with 58mm XL • 120

 

So what’s unique about this E6 kit? Here are the descriptions from their website:

D9 “DynamicChrome” Warm-Tone Dynamic 1st Developer.
Renders approximately 9+ stops of usable dynamic-range*!  Conventional E-6 processing renders approximately 6 stops of usable dynamic-range*. Extended exposure latitude while maintaining vibrant color-contrast and rich warm-tones with preserved highlight and shadow detail (optimized for scanning) for a more cinematic look. High-dynamic-range for warm-tone slides in daylight, shade or with electronic flash.

FarmBuildings_E100_Dynamic
E100 DynamicChrome Developer • Widelux F7 • 35mm ©Schaub 2020

 

D6 “DaylightChrome” Neutral-Tone 5500K 1st Developer.
Renders approximately 6+ stops of usable dynamic-range*, with brighter whites and moderately enhanced color saturation, just like conventional E-6 processing. Daylight-balanced 5500K for neutral-tone slides in daylight or with electronic flash.

Windows_E100_D
E100 DaylightChrome Developer • Fotoman 6×24 with 90mm XL • 120 ©Schaub 2020
Barn_E100_D
E100 DaylightChrome Developer • Fotoman 6×24 with 90mm XL • 120 ©Schaub 2020
Barns_E100_D
E100 DaylightChrome Developer • Fotoman 6×24 with 90mm XL • 120 ©Schaub 2020

T6 “TungstenChrome” Cool-Tone 3200K 1st Developer.
Renders approximately 6+ stops of usable dynamic-range* with brighter whites, and moderately enhanced color saturation. Tungsten-balanced 3200K for artificial light or cool-tone E100T slides. Also, works great for push processing in limited light!

Orchard_E100_P800_T
E100 PUSHED to 800 TungstenChrome • Linhof 6×17 with 90mm SA • 120  ©Schaub 2020             In this example I wanted to see how using the film in daylight and pushing could create interesting cinematic contrast and color… I was very happy with the results.

I found mixing the chemicals to be easy and processing in my JOBO was a piece of cake. I already run my own C41 in house as well as a myriad of B&W developers.

My biggest advice to anyone who wants to process their own E6: the developer temperature is critical. Keep the developer within 1 degree F or less for best color, contrast and density.

For more information please visit:

Cs6 “Creative Slide” 3-Bath Process for color-timing E-6 reversal film

In conclusion…. I think CineStill’s new offering is a unique and valued addition to the E-6 processing community. It doesn’t seem so long ago that Ektachrome was discontinued- temporarily as it turned out. But today that tide has turned, and I continue to be excited by the strong and vibrant resurgence of film and film processing options.

Viva la Revolution!-

Steve

 

Kodak Shares Portfolios

Very excited to announce that Eastman Kodak has been sharing my artworks on their social media feed on Instagram. The most recent portfolio just posted last night– check it out and please follow me on Instagram for the latest news.

@stephenschaub

Viva la Revolution- Steve

CatLABS X Film 320 is Kodak 5222 Double-X

I really dislike it when film or paper is sold under a different name and the identity is kept “secret.” This is now the case with CatLABS X 320 Film which is- in fact- Kodak 5222 Double X film– one of my favorite films in 35mm… but not like this. I purchased three rolls for testing hoping to find a new emulsion to love but instead I spend time and money for nothing. How can I be so sure?… Check out the imprint on the side of the film.

So now that the “cat” is out of the bag I’m off to do some shooting on a beautiful Vermont day.

Viva la Revolution-

Steve

 

Film Testing Kodak 400TX and Diafine Developer

Amazing couple of days running dozens of different developer tests all with 400TX… love the look of the grain and depth of this film! In the end I came back to an old friend but with a new twist. Diafine is back in my life in a big way! Diluted 1:1 and used as a one shot developer it is spot on in my JOBO with very nice grain, great tonality, no processing issues and best of all a usable EI from about 100-1250 (the chart shows 200-1600… I think 1600 is a bit on the edge for my works but is totally usable in a pinch. So again, in a JOBO speed is 4, temp does not really matter but I ran at 75F, Dilute part A and B 1:1… I did 3.5 minutes in each followed by a 2 min wash with water then fix (box time), clear (box time) and hang to dry…. easy as pie!

BarnTest200-1600

Of course an advantage of Diafine that I have written about here before is that many different films can be souped at the same time which is a huge time saver. Diafine negs are a bit flat and do requiere an “S” curve in PS to make me happy but I am now quite happy indeed. I will post links to Diafine articles I have written and a great one from a friend Sandy King from View Camera.

RiverTEST_800_Web

My suggest EI…. 800.

Viva la Revolution– Stephen

All images shot with a Leica MP with a 35MM Summicron ASPH… on Film!

LINKS:

Sandy King Article Diafine…. a must read!

as for articles here… there are a lot!!!! Just type in Diafine in the search box and enjoy!

Also please note these were just quick scans (first set) as I am leaving tomorrow for a week of shooting but the final scan (last image) is quite nice and shows the real potential for this amazing combo.

New Kodak Professional Portra 160 Film Review

When Kodak released the Portra 400 a few months ago many of us speculated that a new Portra 160 would be just around the corner… and guess what? Kodak has announced today that Kodak Professional Portra 160 will be released starting in March 2011 in: 35mm, 120/ 220, 4×5 and 8×10… fantastic!!! Click on the audio-play button to listen to a 13 minute in-depth review of this new film (I tested 120) and be sure to look at the sample images provided below while listening to the audio… What a nice way to start the week!!!

Viva la Revolution- Stephen

Please click on the images below to see larger versions of each.

Indian Hill Imageworks Interior Kodak Portra 160
Eve- Kodak Professional Portra 160- 50" x 71.65" Print!
16" x 20" Crop from a 50" x 71.65" File. WOW!!!
5" x 7" crop from a 50" x 71.65" file... amazing tonality and detail!

George Eastman and Kodak for Kids

I, like many parents, have a hidden hope that one of my children will someday follow in my footsteps and one day become a photographer… a successful photographer, mind you. My oldest daughter was first introduced to photography when I gave her a Polaroid camera slr 680 (SX-70) at the age of four and then later a lighter new plastic Polaroid Spectra System. She’s now eight and for Christmas received a digital camera from her Uncle Chris and most recently I gave her a 1924 No.2 Kodak Brownie Cartridge Hawk-Eye, Model B from my collection (shoots 120mm, 6×9 cm).

With each new camera comes more questions on photography, art and the general “how do you do that“? Meanwhile, my wife Eve has just returned from a trip to Rochester, NY which included a visit to the George Eastman House – an amazing must pilgrimage for all photographers, whether you like Kodak or not- and purchased a comic book (gotta have a souveneir for the kids!) about George Eastman and the early history of Kodak. I, of course, had to read it (okay, twice) and despite its simplistic narrative it does answer many questions my 8 year old has regarding photography and this “new” Brownie camera she’s received… and it is presented in a manner that is accessable and fun to read. Yes, I know any discussion about Kodak nowadays is fraught with controversy and conflicting opinion but for my daughter it is perfect… and waaay more age appropriate than A World History of Photography by Naomi Rosenblum.

I, for one, would like to let her have her moment of blissful discovery for all things photographic- anger regarding Kodak (not to mention Ilford, Fuji and Agfa (RIP) et al) can come later. You know, like in art school!

Amazon LinK: George Eastman and the Kodak Camera (Inventions and Discovery series)