The Human Rangefinder

This instructive video provides a useful technique for making your very own, personalized rangefinder for the purposes of better focus accuracy with camera systems like a Rollei 35 and 35 S, Olympus XA 2, 3 and 4 as well as the LOMO LCA and Diana + camera systems… basically if you have to scale-focus your camera then this video is for you!

LINK:

Human Rangefinder Card Generator

I would again to thank Thomas Achtemichuk for making this very cool photographic tool available! 

Viva la Revolution- Stephen


Tapestry, Vatican Museum, Italy. 2009

Here is another example from my recent photographic trip to Italy where I had to work through a difficult situation with many restrictions but in the end was rewarded with an image I really like. The artwork was made in the Vatican Museum which is really beautiful and amazing, but as you can imagine very strict with rules about what and how you can photograph. This image is an overlapping frame panoramic (3 frames, in camera) of two different tapestries… I visualized my final image and selectively chose different elements from  two different tapestries to create a new tapestry of my own.

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Tapestry, Vatican Museum, Italy. 2009
Triple Overlapping Frame Panoramic Technique
Capture: Olympus XA 4, Kodak Ektar 100
Image Size: 9.5″ x 25″, Printed on Fabriano Rough 640 GSM
Edition Size: One.
Copyright Stephen Schaub 2009

NOTE: Stay tuned for my next two articles on REDSCALE film and thoughts on the Black Cat Extended Exposure Guide.
Viva la Revolution- Stephen

Caligula and Friends

How’s that for a catchy title? The image below represents- as I mentioned in my audio blog journal from Italy – a situation where I had to work though some difficult restrictions but in the end was rewarded with an image I really like. The artwork was made in the Vatican Museum which is really beautiful and amazing, but as you can imagine very strict with rules about what and how you can photograph. When we entered the “room of heads” (my name) I was really drawn to the layers of history and how everything seemed to merge into an ordered historic chaos. This was also a situation where the macro feature of the XA 4 really came in handy!

Caligula and Friends

Caligula and Friends
Vatican Museum, 2009
Triple Overlapping Frame Panoramic Technique
Capture: Olympus XA 4, Kodak Ektar 100
Image Size: 9″ x 25″, Printed on Fabriano Rough 640 GSM
Copyright Stephen Schaub 2009

Overlapping Frame Panoramic Technique

Below find new artworks from my recent photographic trip to Italy. All of the images below were shot on an XA 4 using Kodak Ektar film. I am still scanning and editing my film and anticipate finishing this body of work in a month or two, at which time I will post a complete portfolio. No titles yet; just basic information with each image for identification purposes. The last image in the series however is a photograph of a finished printed artwork from this series and as such has additional information.

To view additional artworks made using this technique please view my A New Eden Artworks.

One last image made since my return and after figuring out how to do this technique on the Rollei 35… experimentation is key!

setsoftreesbenningtonvt1
Sets of Trees, Bennington, Vermont. 2009
Copyright Stephen Schaub. 2009

The One Minute Rant – When Instant Gratification Is Too Instant

1minrant

The fifth installment of the One Minute Rant. Each audio is one minute or less and focuses on a very specific topic to engage readers here on the FR to comment and start a dialogue! Just click on the RANT logo to listen.

Italy Photographic Journal

AudioBlog Logo

I decided to keep a quick audio journal on my recent photographic trip to Italy. Each day recording is around 2 or 3 minutes long, with thoughts on light, travel and places visited as well as on what worked and what didn’t. Also see the snapshots below of places mentioned in the audio, as well as yours truly in Rome… note the well traveled BBB2 (also note how the flash is illuminating the reflective panel… this level of safety is really nice in a city like Rome with its somewhat questionable driving regulations!)

Viva la Revolution! –  Stephen