Make One and Be Done

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Field

New Artwork form my upcoming show at Indian Hill Imageworks, Opening October 9 from 5-7 pm.

  • Hand-held negative pinhole image printed on hand-made Bhutan Mitsumata Thick White paper as a d’Vinci Noir Print
  • Edition size: one.
  • Image size: 22″ x 32″

8 thoughts on “Make One and Be Done

  1. Beautiful work Stephen, dreamy, painterly, haunting. The image, the long exposure and the choice of the hand made paper work extremely well together. I love that you leave no margins, somehow it would break the narrative of the image…. out of curiosity, which pinhole camera, film and how long the exposure? I really love it; good luck at the opening… maro

  2. Thanks… took a while to create a technique for full bleed on these sheets as they are not square and have surface areas that are much ticker than others. The image displayed was shot with the Pinzonie developed by Matt Abelson and myself for the Leica M system… still working on that system. Most of my works now are on the Zero 6×6 but in just a few weeks I will have the Cuboid done by Matt and everything will change… it will be nice to have the option of a pinhole that is not exact for the focal length as it will help with the soft quality I like. That image was on fuji Acros at about 5 or 6 seconds hand held in a lot of wind.

    Cheers-
    Stephen

  3. Intriguing, but scary. It does make a lot of sense to just make a single copy though. Do you keep a digital reference copy though or small paper reference copy?

    Love this image!

    1. I always keep the digital file as it could be used for book reproduction later on or in one case a client who had purchased an artwork from me had a fire and it was destroyed… I was able with the insurance money to print another as a replacement… but this is not always possible with my artworks as in many cases the master paper maker may have died or retired (this has happened several time to me) and as a result there is no way to source new papers unless…

      Cheers-
      Stephen

  4. Very interesting but you are working in a print medium not a painting medium. The negative or digital film is like the plate which can be re-used at any given time. German Expressionist prints were re-struck in the 1970s. What would prevent someone from coming along after you lost control with your files or negatives and reprinted the images? What would a photographic retrospective look like? How would a book be produced? Futhermore, is the print more valuable is produced by the artist, or under the artists supervision, signed or unsigned?

    1. Just because you can make more than one does not mean you should make more than one. Books can be reproduced from the file or in my case from digital copies I make of the actual artworks on the wall- due to the unique nature of the papers I work on no two sheets would ever be the same so a one of one is very easy to realize. All of your questions are also already answered in the world of painting… retrospectives happen at museums all the time where the works are a one of one. How would I lose control of my files? Its my work… make one and delete the file if you like as the work is made… the print/ artwork is what matters not the file on a hard drive… most photographers I know are obsessed with their negatives or digital files… I for one could not care less as once the actual print/ artwork is made of what use is the file/ negative… it is just a step in the process to make the final artwork, nothing more. Of most value to me is a work made by the artists themselves… and yes signed somewhere on the work front or back with a date if possible to help with provenance.

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