12 Responses

  1. I completely agree. How can people trust Olympus again? Who’s to say they won’t release the E-P3 6 months from now?

    Full disclosure: I also did not purchase the E-P1. My K200D and plethora of film cameras will serve me for the foreseeable future :-).

  2. Kyle LeNoir

    I am glad someone said something. I was actually thinking about getting a E-P1 recently til I kept hearing things in the rumor mill. I been really uneasy about buying digital cameras and so are the students I tutor. Everything is happening too fast. I believe people have to kind of “bond” with their equipment to really get the most out of it.

  3. There seem to be two sides to this on the net – those who are still enamoured with the ‘rapid progress’ being made in the digital field and those who have called ‘enough already’.

    The problem seems to em to be twofold – first that digital photography has been an emerging and rapidly developing technology. This has led to rapid upgrade cycles as equipment improved. The pace of improvement has clearly slowed now and there is a level of maturity available that meets most of anyone’s needs plus 50%.

    Of course further development is fine, but the second issue is that the camera manufacturers have taken on the digital mantle of early disposability of product and enjoyed the increased sales that result. This just leads to their seeking to create increased market for repeat orders and turns cameras into the next cell phones (mine is older than most!).

    What is lost in this is the continuity that comes from using equipment for long enough to learn it well, as well as leading to a great deal of cost for end users and angst amongst the camera buying public that their latest and greatest is no longer king of the hill. I have sort of found out that I am, at heart, a handheld 35mm photographer and not the large format person I once aspired to be:)

    There is currently a thrad over on Luminous Landscape where someone is waiting for the 5D3 in order to get improved high iso performance. Blindly assuming that this will be significantly improved and that we are not already approaching physical limits. But the sad thing is that rather than making pictures now, he is waiting for a couple of years to buy what he thinks will be the holy grail. Of course, that will be superceded a couple of years later by the 5D4 or whatever.

    I plan on missing the next round of Canon 1 series upgrades…

    Mike

  4. I know I’ve mentioned them here before, but Red is doing exactly what we all wish olympus had done here. You can buy their current $17,500 camera today, and you can return it when their next model comes out for a FULL $17,500 credit. Why no one else seems to have the same respect their customers, I don’t know.

  5. Kevin S

    No need to fear the E-P2 or the E-P3 to be announced soon. Just accept that technology marches on and tomorrow’s cameras will be better than today’s. Rather than feeling bad for the person who bought an E-P1 a month ago, feel good for the person who was planning to buy one next week.

    Get comfortable with the pace of new camera development because you can’t control it and it’s not worth stewing over. Really, there should be a book… “Zen and the Art of the Digital Camera Upgrade”.

  6. This is what happens when people run and buy immediately everything new on the market, just wait until the dust settles a bit.
    I can’t blame the manufacturers, they are just taking advantage of the typical consumerism prevailing in this country.

  7. cidereye

    I totally agree with your rant Stephen! I am sick to death of the majority of camera press that are frankly sycophantic towards the camera manufacturers on the whole and suck up to them big time far too much probably because they worry about advertising revenue far more than they do their readers who are the potential customers of these companies. In the written press most camera mags are nothing more than sham battle reviews of all new product X v all new product Y in the never ending sea of the latest must have new cameras.

    They feed this constant unsustainable deluge of camera updates and I blame them even more than the camera manufacturers themselves. Instead of teaching skills they promote purchasing equipment over learning which is disgraceful. Camera stores are just as bad mind, most people who own DSLR’s use them in either full auto or Prog mode all the time anyways as they don’t understand how to use their camera properly and were oversold a product to begin with that they probably never really needed.

    So yes the camera manufacturers are guilty as charged but the sycophants that help feed them are equally to blame if not more so!

  8. Alex H

    I don’t think you should be so angry, after all EP-1 was the first.
    How about an EP camera with a Rangefinder, think that will ever happen.

  9. robert e

    With respect: Excuse me? No one was forced to buy an E-P1. No one is now forced to buy an E-P2.

    On the contrary, I remember Olympus being up front about their plan to offer a system, including multiple bodies with differing feature sets. They further indicated that the E-P1 was neither the most full-featured model planned, nor the one best suited for experienced shooters.

    Those facts were apparently not shiny enough, and were glossed over by the usual pavlovian feeding frenzy of “press” and equipment geeks and trigger-happy consumers. Even so, the flaws of the E-P1 were well known and widely discussed.

    So I agree with cidereye. This rant is largely misdirected, especially considering that the GF1 addressed most of the E-P1’s flaws months ago, and is in some ways still superior to the E-P2.

    No one is forced to upgrade. The new model doesn’t make the old model perform any worse than it did when people bought it and were satisfied enough to keep it. If you don’t want to upgrade every five months, don’t. If you don’t want to get stuck owning the buggy version 1.0 of anything, don’t buy the buggy version 1.0 of anything. If you don’t want to pay the early-adopter premium, don’t.

    If you don’t want to follow those common-sense practices, that’s fine, too–go ahead and have fun; but take responsibility for your actions.

    There, how’s that for a one minute rant?

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